Sunday, 24 November 2013

Saffron Risotto (Risotto alla Milanese)

Give an Italian saffron and the first response is saffron risotto (risotto alla milanese).  That was my response at least, after my friend gave me saffron from Lebanon.

Risotto alla Milanese is a beautiful risotto with saffron and parmesan.  It's a classic. 

Remember, the key to any good risotto is lots of stirring.  They're not hard to make, it just takes time and care.  In the winter it's actually not bad to be hovering over a stove stirring a pot with the steam in your face.  My clothes still smell of saffron - I think it's wonderful.  It's like smelling of gold. 
 Credits to Qi, who took the photos and gave me the saffron.


And by the way, that big block in the photo -- that's the end of a block of parmesan.  Never throw that away! It's the best part, add it to a sauce that needs to be cooked for a while or add it to a risotto at the very beginning along with the rice - it adds so much flavor.  

Serves 3
Ingredients
280g arborio rice
1L or more vegetable/chicken/beef stock
1 small white onion, finely diced
1/2 tsp saffron threads
1/2 cup white wine
50g grated parmesan
1 knob of butter

Method
In a small skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium heat until melted. Add sage and cook until fragrant. Remove and discard sage. Remove sage butter from heat and set aside.
Heat oil and 1 tablespoon of the remaining butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion softens, about 5 minutes. Add rice and cook, stirring, until rice becomes translucent. This process is known as tostatura, or toasting.
Add wine, stirring, until it is mostly absorbed, then add 1 cupful broth and saffron. Simmer, stirring frequently, until broth is almost absorbed. Continue adding broth in ½ cupfuls, stirring often and allowing each addition to mostly evaporate before adding next, until rice is tender but still slightly firm to the bite and mixture is creamy (you will have broth left over).
Stir in remaining 3½ tablespoons butter, reserved sage butter, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt to taste. Add an additional cup of broth, stir to combine, and serve “all’onda” (a “wavy” or wet-style risotto) immediately.
- See more at: http://lacucinaitalianamagazine.com/recipe/risotto_alla_milanese#sthash.SwQnKs0K.dpuf
Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil with a knob of butter over medium high heat.  Add onion and cook, stirring until it softens, about 5 min.  Add the rice and cook until it becomes slightly translucent.

Add saffron, stir until everything's a bright golden yellow

Add wine and cook, stirring, until almost evaporated. Add 1 cup stock to saucepan and cook, stirring, until almost all the liquid is absorbed. Continue cooking, adding 1 cup of stock at a time and stirring until each addition has been absorbed before adding more. Continue process until rice is tender and creamy but still slightly al dente, about 17 minutes; you may not need to use all the stock.

Stir in the parmesan and a knob of butter and serve. 

Add wine, stirring, until it is mostly absorbed, then add 1 cupful broth and saffron. Simmer, stirring frequently, until broth is almost absorbed. Continue adding broth in ½ cupfuls, stirring often and allowing each addition to mostly evaporate before adding next, until rice is tender but still slightly firm to the bite and mixture is creamy (you will have broth left over). - See more at: http://lacucinaitalianamagazine.com/recipe/risotto_alla_milanese#sthash.SwQnKs0K.dpuf

In a small skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium heat until melted. Add sage and cook until fragrant. Remove and discard sage. Remove sage butter from heat and set aside.
Heat oil and 1 tablespoon of the remaining butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion softens, about 5 minutes. Add rice and cook, stirring, until rice becomes translucent. This process is known as tostatura, or toasting.
Add wine, stirring, until it is mostly absorbed, then add 1 cupful broth and saffron. Simmer, stirring frequently, until broth is almost absorbed. Continue adding broth in ½ cupfuls, stirring often and allowing each addition to mostly evaporate before adding next, until rice is tender but still slightly firm to the bite and mixture is creamy (you will have broth left over).
Stir in remaining 3½ tablespoons butter, reserved sage butter, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt to taste. Add an additional cup of broth, stir to combine, and serve “all’onda” (a “wavy” or wet-style risotto) immediately.
- See more at: http://lacucinaitalianamagazine.com/recipe/risotto_alla_milanese#sthash.SwQnKs0K.dpuf
In a small skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium heat until melted. Add sage and cook until fragrant. Remove and discard sage. Remove sage butter from heat and set aside.
Heat oil and 1 tablespoon of the remaining butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion softens, about 5 minutes. Add rice and cook, stirring, until rice becomes translucent. This process is known as tostatura, or toasting.
Add wine, stirring, until it is mostly absorbed, then add 1 cupful broth and saffron. Simmer, stirring frequently, until broth is almost absorbed. Continue adding broth in ½ cupfuls, stirring often and allowing each addition to mostly evaporate before adding next, until rice is tender but still slightly firm to the bite and mixture is creamy (you will have broth left over).
Stir in remaining 3½ tablespoons butter, reserved sage butter, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and salt to taste. Add an additional cup of broth, stir to combine, and serve “all’onda” (a “wavy” or wet-style risotto) immediately.
- See more at: http://lacucinaitalianamagazine.com/recipe/risotto_alla_milanese#sthash.SwQnKs0K.dpuf

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